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September 15 2015

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How Septic Systems Work



Households that are not served by public drains generally depend upon septic tanks to treat and deal with wastewater. Septic systems represent a significant monetary investment. If looked after effectively, a well created, set up, and kept system will certainly offer years of reputable, low-priced service.

A failing system can become a source of pollution and public health concern, causing property damage, ground and surface area water pollution (such as well water-- both yours and your next-door neighbors), and disease break outs. When your septic tank fails to run successfully, you might need to change it, costing you thousands of dollars. Plus, if you offer your home, your septic tank has to be in great working order. For that reason, it makes good sense to understand and look after your septic tank.

There are many different types of septic tanks that fit a vast array of soil and site conditions. The following will help you comprehend the main elements of a standard (gravity fed) septic system and ways to keep it operating safely at the lowest possible cost.

A conventional septic tank system has three main parts:

The Septic Tank-- A septic tank's purpose is to separate solids from the wastewater, shop and partly decay as much strong product as possible, while permitting the liquid (or effluent) to go to the drainfield.

The Drainfield-- After solids settle in the septic tank, the liquid wastewater (or effluent) is discharged to the drainfield, likewise known as an absorption or leach field.

The Soil-- The soil below the drainfield offers the last treatment and disposal of the septic tank effluent. After the wastewater has entered the soil, organisms in the soil deal with the effluent prior to it percolates downward and outside, ultimately getting in ground or surface water. The kind of soil likewise impacts the effectiveness of the drainfield; for example, clay soils may be too tight to enable much wastewater to pass through and gravelly soil may be too coarse to supply much treatment.

Maintenance Tips

Homeowners and homeowners have an excellent impact on septic tank performance. Utilizing more water than the system was created to handle can cause a failure. Also disposal of chemical or excess raw material, such as that septic cleaning from a waste disposal unit, can damage a septic tank. The following maintenance ideas can help your system offer long-lasting, reliable treatment of family waste.

Check and Pump Regularly

The most crucial step to maintaining your septic tank is to remove sludge and residue accumulation before it cleans into the drainfield. How typically your tank needs pumping depends on the size of the tank, the number of people in your family, the volume of water utilized, and amount of solids (from people, garbage disposals, and any other wastes) getting in the system. Generally, tanks need to be pumped every 3 to 5 years.

Use Water Effectively

Excessive water is a major cause of system failure. The soil under the septic tank must absorb all the water made use of in the house. Excessive water from laundry, dishwasher, toilets, baths, and showers may not enable adequate time for sludge and scum to separate. The less water utilized, the less water going into the septic system, leading to less threat of system failure.

Decrease Solid Garbage disposal

What goes down the drain can have a major effect on your septic tank. Many materials do not decompose and subsequently, build up in your septic tank. If you can throw away it in some other way, doing this, instead of putting it into your system.

Keep Chemicals Out of Your System

Keep family chemicals out of your septic tank, such as caustic drain openers, paints, pesticides, photographic chemicals, brake fluid, fuel, and motor oil. Inappropriate disposal of poisonous chemicals down the drain is unsafe to the environment, as well as the germs had to break down wastes in the septic tank.

Septic tank Additives

Adding a stimulator or a booster to a septic tank to help it function or "to bring back bacterial balance" is not required. The naturally taking place bacteria required for the septic system Septic Zone to work are already present in human feces.

What Can Go Wrong?

Like an auto, septic systems are created to supply long-term, effective treatment of home waste when operated and maintained correctly. Nevertheless, the majority of systems that fail prematurely are due to incorrect maintenance.

If you observe any of the following indications or if you presume your septic system may be having issues, get in touch with a certified septic professional.

- Odors, emerging sewage, wet areas, or lush vegetation development in the drainfield location

- Plumbing or septic tank backups (frequently a black liquid with a disagreeable smell).

- Slow draining fixtures.

- Gurgling sounds in the plumbing system.

- If you have a well and checks show the presence of coliform (bacteria) or nitrates, your drainfield may be failing.

- Rich green yard over the drainfield, even during dry weather.



September 09 2015

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Jonesborough police warn residents about septic treatment scam - Johnson City Press (subscription)

scam

Johnson City Press Sep 8, 2015 at 5:29 PM

Jonesborough police issued a scam alert Tuesday advising residents to be wary of calls asking them to purchase chemical treatment for septic systems.

Police said the Town of Jonesborough was notified of the scam calls saying that a chemical treatment that needed to be added to septic systems over the course of five weeks.

In the event of an emergency regarding any town resource such as water, waste water, or solid waste, the Town of Jonesborough will notify those affected by sending a uniformed employee with a valid town ID to your residence or by mail, police said in the release.

Police advised residents not to ever give out personal information or bank account numbers over the phone.

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September 07 2015

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Tulsa Walmart To Reopen After Closing For Plumbing Issues, Renovations - News On 6

TULSA, Oklahoma -

Walmart will be reopening its store near Interstate 244 in Tulsa after reported plumbing issues caused it to close in April, the retail giant says.

Contractors have been seen at the Admiral and Memorial location throughout the summer. The original projected re-opening date was in October, and it appears Walmart is sticking to that timeline.

"While the process to conduct plumbing repairs and store upgrades is still ongoing, our goal is to begin serving customers by late October or early November," a spokesperson said.

4/14/2015 Related Story: Customers Turned Away From Tulsa Walmart Closed For Plumbing Problems

That location will now begin a hiring process.

"This includes communicating with associates that have transferred to surrounding area stores and encouraging all others interested in exploring employment opportunities with Walmart to also apply," a news release says. "We thank the community for their patience as we work through these issues and are excited to give our customers a store that better reflects the shopping experience we are providing today in other markets across the country.

Other Walmarts across the United States experienced similar renovation problems, the company announced earlier this year. In Texas, Midland and Livingston stores were closed for six months, and stores in California and Florida also were closed, citing the same issues. All those stores also are said to be undergoing a facelift inside also.

The temporary closures caused interesting conspiracy theories to circulate around the United States. Some people told News On 6 they believed the store in Tulsa was not emptied of people because of needed renovations, but it was being used instead as a secret indoor military camp to train the U.S. Army to carry out martial law.

Others said they believed Walmart closed the doors because it was trying to punish local workers for wanting to join a union.

4/23/2015 Related Story: Tulsa Walmart Closing Spawns Conspiracy Theories

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Private engineering colleges may teach plumbing, carpentry - Hindustan Times

With demand for engineering courses in the country plummeting and a whopping 13,27,598 seats in engineering colleges going vacant in the last three years, the government is actively considering utilisation of capacities in such institutes by introducing skill development and entrepreneurial courses. This would help enhance skill development capacity with minimum investment and an optimal utilisation of resources.

These institutes include both government and private institutes and comprise IITs, NITs, and renowned engineering colleges. With a huge number of engineering seats not filling up, there has been a gross underutilisation of capacities in engineering institutes across the country. As a result, many of these institutes have approached us to introduce skilling and vocational courses like plumbing, carpentry, etc, so that the existing infrastructure and capacity is put to good use, a top government official told HT.

Engineering institutes in Jharkhand, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, and Bihar have been hit the hardest.

But there is a hitch. The All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) forbids using the facilities in engineering colleges for any other reason other than teaching the approved engineering courses.

The AICTE, under the HRD ministry, is responsible for proper planning and coordinated development of technical education in India. An official document accessed by HT says: Many of the polytechnics and engineering institutions have been requesting for reduction of seats, closure of courses, even closure of institutes, because AICTE does not allow non-AICTE approved courses in these buildings even though on an average only 50% of the capacity is utilised in AICTE-approved courses.

These institutions have been established with financial assistance from banks and less than the capacity enrolment will limit the capacity of the stakeholders to pay back the installments, it goes on to say.

Accordingly, the skill development ministry has already written to the HRD ministry to remove the condition of exclusivity by AICTE. The response from HRD ministry and the AICTE has been quite positive and we hope to launch such skill development courses in these colleges soon enough, paving the way for convergence and co-existence with AICTE-approved courses, the official said.

Skill development is a top priority sector for the ruling BJP-led NDA government.

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Sewer upgrade contract passes - Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

The Fort Wayne Board of Public Works on Wednesday approved a contract for a $2.5 million sewer separation project south of downtown.

Known as Phase 2 of the Taylor-Hale sewer separation project, the contract was awarded to Atlas Excavating of Fort Wayne and will add 6,200 feet of storm pipe west of the St. Marys River along Taylor, Brown and Paul streets, as well as Bevel and Brooklyn avenues. Its the last of nine large-scale sewer separation projects south of downtown.

Sewer separation projects are designed to eliminate the citys aging combined sewer systems. Combined sewer systems take in sewer waste and stormwater, which can cause backups that ultimately discharge into Fort Waynes rivers.

Those nine projects, all south of Jefferson Boulevard, cost a combined $12,539,500. The projects are part of the 2008 consent decree or legal settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Indiana Department of Environmental Management to significantly reduce combined sewer overflow into the citys rivers during heavy rainfall.

The city must reduce the number of combined sewer overflows into Fort Waynes three rivers the St. Joseph, St. Marys and the Maumee from an average of 76 overflows per year to four. The city has to achieve that goal by 2025.

On Aug. 25, the city announced that the St. Joseph River had reached compliance with the EPA mandate four years ahead of schedule.

Combined with eight other major sewer separation projects completed south of downtown since 2008, the Taylor-Hale project is expected to reduce combined sewer overflows into the St. Marys River by nearly 30 million gallons.

While the contract awarded Wednesday represents the last of the major sewer separation projects, Kelly Bajic, an engineer with Fort Wayne City Utilities, said city crews will continue to address smaller projects in the area as the need arises.

Well always review if we need to do a little bit of separation here or there, based on flooding complaints or backup complaints, she said.

Though the Taylor-Hale project is the last major sewer separation south of downtown, more major separation projects are planned for other areas of the city in the near future, said Matthew Wirtz, deputy director of Fort Wayne City Utilities.

There will be major separation projects in the Lakeside neighborhood and the Bloomingdale neighborhood on the citys north side in the near future, he said. Those projects will help mitigate overflows along the St. Marys and the Maumee rivers. Both projects are directly related to the citys consent decree efforts.

We just started design on both of them, Bajic said.

Work is expected to continue on meeting the EPA mandate, Wirtz said. The first phases of the Lakeside and Bloomingdale projects are expected to bid sometime in 2016.

The city also plans to build relief sewers in the area around State Boulevard and Lake Avenue. Those sewer projects will be put out to bid next year as well. Following that, the city plans to start working on the $180 million deep rock tunnel, a 150-foot deep tunnel that city officials say will be the most expensive public works investment in the citys history.

Thats a lot of work, Wirtz said, chuckling.

dgong@jg.net

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Living On the Land class registration open - The Reflector

HAZEL DELL Registration for WSU Clark County Extensions Small Acreage Programs 12-week class series, Living On the Land Stewardship for Small Acreages, is now open.

Sponsored by WSU Clark County Extension and Clark County Environmental Services Clean Water Program, this course prepares participants with the knowledge necessary to develop a sustainable property management plan.

The class will take place on Thursdays, Sept. 3 through Nov. 19, 6-9 p.m.

Living On the Land participants learn about important topics pertaining to soil, water, plants and animals that guide sound stewardship decisions for small acreage management. Topics are presented by local and regional experts and include pasture management, controlling weeds, wildlife, soil health, well and septic maintenance, and many more.

Graduates of this training come away with knowledge about how different aspects of their property interact, practices that enhance natural resources, and helpful strategies for improving their property by taking a whole farm approach. In addition they create a workable property plan for their goals within the stewardship framework learned in class.

Eric Lambert, program coordinator, said There are many new small acreage landowners in Clark County and a lot of folks who just want to improve their current property. The Small Acreage Program provides them with simple, practical ideas on how to best manage their property for themselves, their animals, and the environment.

Doug Stienbarger, director of WSU Clark County Extension, added This course covers important issues landowners need to address to achieve their goals. Living On the Land teaches management practices that help landowners save time and money, improve property value, and protect natural resources.

The class is also recommended by Don Benton, director Clark County Environmental Services, a sponsor of the Small Acreage Program

This educational program provides the best available in our county for small acreage residents to learn stewardship practices, and I highly recommend it. Benton said.

Registration is $35 per farm or family and class size is limited; deadline for registration is Fri., Aug. 28. Call or email Eric Lambert at (360) 397-6060, ext. 5729 or eric.lambert@wsu.edu to register, or for more information about WSU Clark County Extensions Small Acreage Program.

WSU Extension programs are available to all without discrimination. Persons requiring special accommodations should call WSU Clark County Extension at (360) 397-6060 ext. 0 at least two weeksprior to the event.

2015 The Reflector. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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September 06 2015

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Waste Management, Inc. Price Target Update - News Watch International

Waste Management, Inc. (NYSE:WM): 3 Brokerage firm Analysts have agreed with the mean estimate for the short term price target of $55.33 in Waste Management, Inc. (NYSE:WM). However, the stock price could fluctuate by $ 2.52 from the estimate as it is suggested by the standard deviation reading. The higher estimate has been put at $58 price target with the lower price estimate is calculated at $53

Research firm Zacks has rated Waste Management, Inc. (NYSE:WM) and has ranked it at 2, indicating that for the short term the shares are a buy. 10 Wall Street analysts have given the company an average rating of 2.4. The shares have received a hold rating based on the suggestion from 7 analysts in latest recommendations. Strong buy was given by 3 Wall Street Analysts.

On a different note, The Company has disclosed insider buying and selling activities to the Securities Exchange, The Securities and Exchange Commission has divulged that Schwartz Mark E., officer (Sr. VP, Human Resources) of Waste Management Inc, had unloaded 4,983 shares at an average price of $52.05 in a transaction dated on August 17, 2015. The total value of the transaction was worth $259,365.

Waste Management, Inc. (NYSE:WM) rose 1% or 0.5 points on Thursday and made its way into the gainers of the day. After trading began at $49.88 the stock was seen hitting $50.55 as a peak level and $49.88 as the lowest level. The stock ended up at $50.28. The daily volume was measured at 1,934,753 shares. The 52-week high of the share price is $55.93 and the 52-week low is $45.5. The company has a market cap of $22,739 million.

Currently the company Insiders own 0.1% of Waste Management, Inc. Company shares. In the past six months, there is a change of -28.16% in the total insider ownership. Institutional Investors own 80.7% of Company shares. During last 3 month period, -2.51% of total institutional ownership has changed in the company shares.

The company shares have rallied 6.1% in the past 52 Weeks. On April 10, 2015 The shares registered one year high of $55.93 and one year low was seen on October 15, 2014 at $45.5. The 50-day moving average is $50.35 and the 200 day moving average is recorded at $50.99. S&P 500 has rallied 2.59% during the last 52-weeks.

Many analysts have commented on the company rating. Brokerage firm Argus Research upgrades its rating on Waste Management, Inc. (NYSE:WM). The shares have been rated Buy . Previously, the analysts had a Hold rating on the shares. The rating by the firm was issued on July 28, 2015.

Waste Management, Inc. (WM) is a provider of waste management services in North America. WMs subsidiaries provide collection, transfer, recycling, and disposal services. WM is a developer, operator and owner of waste-to-energy and landfill gas-to-energy facilities in the United States. Its customers include residential, commercial, industrial and municipal customers throughout North America. Its segments include Eastern, Midwest, Southern, Western and Wheelabrator Groups. The Oakleaf operations are included in other. The services the Company provides include collection, landfill, transfer, waste-to-energy facilities and independent power production plants, recycling and other services. In January 2013, its subsidiary, WM Recycle America, L.L.C., acquired Greenstar, LLC. Effective August 1, 2013, Waste Management Inc acquired Summit Energy Services, and concurrently, WM acquired Liquid Logistics. Effective August 1, 2013, Waste Management Inc acquired Oak Grove Disposal Co.



For any feedback, suggestions and tips, contact author at Jeff.Gordon@newswatchinternational.com

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I'm off the water grid, so do I still need to take short showers? - Grist

Q. We live in a drought-stricken part of California (i.e., we live in California), but we get our water from a well, pumped by our solar panels. Household wastewater goes into our septic, where presumably 100 percent of it trickles back into the water table over the years. So Im thinking that wasting water doesnt mean the same thing in our household, and that questions like cloth vs. disposable diapers become a lot clearer and tilt more fully into the intuitive direction. What does Umbra think?

Kipchoge S.

North San Juan, CA

Q. I live in rural Maine and have a private well and septic system.My water isnt treated or pumped from some distant location, just pumped a few yards from my spigot.Since wells dont hold water like a reservoir, water availability for me is completely dependent on groundwater levels. Except for the electricity, does it matter if I take a shower or a bath?

Barbara M.

West Paris, ME

A. Dearest Kipchoge and Barbara,

When I was younger, an older kid at school had me convinced that he possessed a so-called Free Slushie Pass. This magical token entitled the bearer to unlimited slushies from the corner store in all colors of the rainbow, for life. He never did tell me the secret to obtaining such a pass but oh, how I coveted one. It took years for me to realize that it was all a joke. Unfortunately, whats true of slushies is also true of water: Theres no such thing as a free pass.

I get where youre coming from, Kipchoge and Barbara. Unlike most of us, who draw our water from a big old pool managed by a public water utility, you two are drinking a lot closer to the source the groundwater right beneath your homes. This underground supply is periodically recharged by rain and snowmelt from our water cycle, plus, presumably, whatever water your septic system discharges into your leach field. Since thats coming directly from your washing machines, toilets, shower drains, and other household sources, one can assume that the water you use in daily life makes it way down to the groundwater in time.

This does not a closed loop make, however, and water conservation should be of particular concern to anyone with this kind of setup. For one, the most common cause of a septic system failure is flooding it with too much water at once. In a perfectly functioning system, your wastewater chills out in your septic tank long enough for solids to settle out (forming the aptly named sludge) and partially decompose. Then, the contents are gradually released into your leach field to be further broken down by friendly soil microbes. But the old stuff is discharged when new stuff from your home enters the tank so if youre sending too much wastewater in, too much wastewater will be pushed out to make room.

A few unappetizing, not to mention downright dangerous, things can happen next. You could overwhelm the soil in your leach field, so that the contents of your septic tank back up into your house. Or you could end up with pools of not-quite-decomposed sludge in your yard, which can run off and pollute nearby waterways not to mention your own drinking well, oh dear with bacteria, viruses, and excess nutrients. And a fouled well means costly repairs, as does a saturated septic system, in case the sewage in the well thing wasnt quite enough motivation to prevent such a water calamity.

I should also mention that even water misers need to look out for soil saturation with a septic system for one simple reason: rain (well, maybe not lately for you, Kipchoge). Heavy rain can also temporarily soak your leach field, so you must be extra-careful about water use when the weather turns nasty.

On top of all that, heres one more reason to be a sipper, not a guzzler: That well could run dry, something that has already happened to some Californians this year. Even the bountiful aquifer under our feet has its limits.

For all these reasons, you two, I recommend watching your water use carefully. Sticking with disposable diapers is one way to significantly reduce laundry water in your home, Kipchoge. And Barbara, youll likely save buckets if you limit your baths to special occasions. It would be lovely to have an unlimited supply of water. But just like that Free Slushie Pass, the idea turns out to be too good to be true.

Conservatively,

Umbra

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Regular maintenance saves big septic tank bill - Pratt Tribune

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Tulsa Walmart To Reopen After Closing For Plumbing Issues, Renovations - News On 6

TULSA, Oklahoma -

Walmart will be reopening its store near Interstate 244 in Tulsa after reported plumbing issues caused it to close in April, the retail giant says.

Contractors have been seen at the Admiral and Memorial location throughout the summer. The original projected re-opening date was in October, and it appears Walmart is sticking to that timeline.

"While the process to conduct plumbing repairs and store upgrades is still ongoing, our goal is to begin serving customers by late October or early November," a spokesperson said.

4/14/2015 Related Story: Customers Turned Away From Tulsa Walmart Closed For Plumbing Problems

That location will now begin a hiring process.

"This includes communicating with associates that have transferred to surrounding area stores and encouraging all others interested in exploring employment opportunities with Walmart to also apply," a news release says. "We thank the community for their patience as we work through these issues and are excited to give our customers a store that better reflects the shopping experience we are providing today in other markets across the country.

Other Walmarts across the United States experienced similar renovation problems, the company announced earlier this year. In Texas, Midland and Livingston stores were closed for six months, and stores in California and Florida also were closed, citing the same issues. All those stores also are said to be undergoing a facelift inside also.

The temporary closures caused interesting conspiracy theories to circulate around the United States. Some people told News On 6 they believed the store in Tulsa was not emptied of people because of needed renovations, but it was being used instead as a secret indoor military camp to train the U.S. Army to carry out martial law.

Others said they believed Walmart closed the doors because it was trying to punish local workers for wanting to join a union.

4/23/2015 Related Story: Tulsa Walmart Closing Spawns Conspiracy Theories

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August 24 2015

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Learn about your septic system in Septics 101, 102 - Sequim Gazette

  - Submitted photo

image credit: Submitted photo

Do you want to learn more about septic maintenance? Be certified to inspect your own septic system?

Clallam County Health and Human Services, Environmental Health Section is offering two Septics 101 (Septics Maintenance) and two Septics 201 (Do-It-Yourself Septic Inspection) classes this March and April. Pre-registration is required and available online at www.clallam.net under Online Services or by contacting Environmental Health at 417-2506.

Interested in septic maintenance? Attend Septics 101 class. This free two-hour class provides homeowners with an overview of the what, why and how of septic system maintenance. The Septics 101 classes will be held at Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, Sequim, from 6-8 p.m. on Tuesday, March 3, and Wednesday, April 8.

As an alternate to the class, there is an online Septic 101 version available via the Environmental Health website at www.clallam.net/Septics101.

Interested in becoming certified to inspect your own septic system? Attend Septics 201 Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Self-Inspection class. This free 2.5-hour class provides homeowners an overview of the what, why and how of safely inspecting your septic system and includes an instructional video, a Clallam County Department of Health and Human Services brief demonstration and a short exam.

Not all septic systems are eligible for homeowner inspection and systems located in the Marine Recovery Area (between Bagley Creek watershed and east to the county boundary) must first be inspected by a licensed septic inspector.

Septic inspections are required by state law: gravity septic systems inspected every three years; all other systems inspected annually. Remember: Pumping is not the same as an inspection.

The Septics 201 classes will be held at Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, Sequim, from 6-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 17, and Wednesday, April 22.

Pre-registration is required and available online at www.clallam.net under Online Services or by contacting Environmental Health at 417-2506.

Septics 101 (either the in-person class or online version at www.clallam.net/Septics101) is a prerequisite for Septics 201. Not all septic types are eligible for Septics 201 DIY inspections. Before registering, go to www.clallam.net/septic, click on Summary of Septic System Inspection. Requirements and check your eligibility.

An online Septics 201 DIY course also is available via the Environmental Health website accessible at www.clallam.net/Septics201DIY.

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August 22 2015

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Five on Three: CTX Plumbing Co.-Celina - Star Local Media

Austin Cardwell

Master Plumber/Owner/Service Technician, CTX Plumbing Co.

CTX Plumbing is a family and locally owned business serving Dallas and surrounding areas. We specialize in general maintenance, repairs and replacement of any plumbing fixture both residential and commercial.

Business address: PO Box 1494, Celina, TX 75009

Year opened: 2015

Number of employees: 3

Website: ctxpc.com *currently under construction

Phone: 972-900-9959

What does your business offer that is unique compared to similar businesses?

CTX Plumbing offers a level of professionalism never before seen in our industry. We take pride in our work, on every job we step foot into as if it were our own home or business. We have developed a system that stands above all that we can be proud of. Honesty, hard work and fairness are the backbone of our business. We understand as a small business that each and every customer is just as important as the next. To succeed, we want that customer to not only call us back in the future, but to refer us to friends because of how they were treated when we had the pleasure to assist them with their plumbing needs. Our goal is to stay transparent with our customers: You know what we are doing and why.

What is the most important part of your job on a daily basis?

Customer retention and leaving the job knowing that the customer was taken care of professionally and is satisfied with CTX Plumbing. We want to be proud to drive our van down the road with our logo representing not only our company, but our community. We tell our employees that we are not just in the service business: We are into building relations within the community.

What are your keys to success?

As a business owner, my success comes from my willingness to work when others are not. It is a constant balance between spending time with my wife and baby girl, and taking that late-day call. Growing up in the country with three brothers wasnt easy, but my father managed to teach us all how to work hard, work fast but to always walk away proud of the work we just finished. My father has been a plumber for almost 30 years and continues to work hard to this day. We instill those very same ethics into our company handbook and require our employees to meet those specifications. Our employees are trained to be professionals in every aspect of our industry.

What surprises you most about your job?

The amount of taxes we have to pay kidding. Seriously, though, what surprises me the most is every year we have to take a Continuing Education class to stay updated on new codes, laws and what is new in the industry. It amazes me how much technology is changing the plumbing industry on a regular basis.

Tell us something most people wouldn't know about your company.

What separates CTX from the rest of our competitors is that we are local, stationed right here in your back yard within minutes of your home or business. We are open 24 hours and we understand that emergencies dont plan on occurring at the most convenient times. We are here to serve our customers, not the other way around. We drain your pipes, not your wallet!

To be featured in Five on Three, contact Conner Hammett at chammett@starlocalmedia.com.

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August 20 2015

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City working on program to expand water, sewer service - ThisWeekNews

Sewer and water service could be coming to some unserved areas of Dublin, although for some it might still take awhile.

Dublin City Council last week heard from city staff members about extending water and sanitary sewer service to developed land in the city that doesn't have the services.

During the Aug. 10 Dublin City Council meeting, City Public Services Director Megan O'Callaghan told council about the amount of developed property in Dublin with no water or sewer service and how the city can fix the situation.

According to O'Callaghan a 2013 assessment and inventory of household sewage treatment systems found 378 throughout the city.

"The majority of the systems in Dublin are in good shape," she said.

Many of the systems, however, serve homes along the Scioto River and "are of greater concern from a public health perspective as they discharge directly into watercourses, storm sewers or drainage tiles," the staff report to council stated.

Problems could also arise in areas around Grandee Cliffs Drive, Summit View Road, Glencree Place and Trails End Drive, where many systems could be nearing the end of their lives.

"Replacement of failing soil-based systems can be difficult due to poor soils, shallow bedrock and other factors," the staff report said.

Extending water services to these areas would cost the city an estimated $5.95 million and sewer extensions are anticipated to cost $12.45 million, O'Callaghan said.

City policy requires homeowners to connect to water and sewer lines if they are within 100 feet of the property line within 90 days. This rule has not been enforced and the recent study found 158 properties within 100 feet of water service and 105 properties within 100 feet of sanitary sewer service.

O'Callaghan recommended starting enforcement of the law, but allowing residents at least two years to make the connection.

"Staff recommends the city do their due diligence to get people connected to the systems," she said, adding it will be in the best interest of safety and health for residents.

O'Callaghan's recommendation also included a 25-year plan for getting water and sewer extensions to all unserved areas of Dublin, with money for starting the extensions programmed into the five-year Capital Improvements Program in 2017.

The city would also start notifying residents of extensions coming to their area when the construction is programmed in the CIP.

If residents believe their sewer and water extension won't come soon enough, O'Callaghan proposed an option that would allow residents to petition the city to move up the project by getting at least 85 percent of residents in the area on board.

Whereas the city would pay to extend water and sewer lines throughout the city, residents would have to fund the connection of their home to the line, tap fees, capacity charges and other costs.

O'Callaghan estimated fees could cost about $9,000, not counting the cost of the construction of a li

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August 17 2015

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Leaky sink? Order a plumber on Amazon. - Washington Post

Amazon announced Wednesday that it's expanding its on-demand home services business -- transparently named "Amazon Home Services" -- to 15 new cities, including Washington, D.C.

The program was already operating in New York, San Francisco, Seattle and Los Angeles, offering users an easy way to book plumbers, electricians, cleaners and other people who can handle the things you may need around the house. The company announced that it is also expanding the service to let people request help with custom jobs, rather than just the pre-packaged services previously offered.

(Amazon's chief executive, Jeffrey P. Bezos, is the owner of The Washington Post.)

Simplicity is certainly what Amazon is touting as it tries to win over customers in this field. Users can book from the Amazon Web site, by offering a description of the job they want done, which they then get a price quote for online or on-site.

"Amazon Home Services makes buying a service as easy as buying a product on Amazon," said Nish Lathia, General Manager of Amazon Home Services, in a press release.

The competition in the on-demand space for home tasks is heating up. Companies such as TaskRabbit jumped in early to the "gig" economy -- in fact, it integrates with Home Services -- and now a host other of cleaning, laundry and other service companies such as Handy, Thumbtack and others have found success providing on-demand workers to take care of your home needs.

Amazon says its Home Services "pros," as the service calls them, are vetted and required to keep all appropriate licenses to continue working with the service. Some use Amazon to expand their own businesses.

Google is also thought to be jumping into the space. The company recently hired the technical team from Homejoy, a home-cleaning startup that shut down in part because it faced a lawsuit for classifying its workers as contractors rather than employees, Recode reported. The report suggested that Google may try and bake some sort of services link into its search results -- a sort of instant referral from the search page.



Hayley Tsukayama covers consumer technology for The Washington Post.

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August 15 2015

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Most Legionnaire's disease deaths tied to plumbing systems, CDC says - CBS News

As New York City struggles to contain an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, two new U.S. government reports show the bacteria that causes the potentially deadly illness can take root in a myriad of water sources.

Those sources can include poorly maintained hot tubs, water fountains and cooling towers, the researchers said.

"The variety of settings and water sources implicated in the Legionella outbreaks reported here highlights the complexity of Legionella control . . . particularly in settings where susceptible persons congregate, such as hospitals, long-term care facilities, and other health-care settings," Karlyn Beer, of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and colleagues wrote.

The New York investigation has pinpointed cooling towers used for air conditioning as the source of more than 100 illnesses and 12 deaths in the South Bronx. But across the nation, improperly treated drinking water accounts for a rising proportion of outbreaks, the CDC team said in one of their two reports.

Two-thirds of 32 outbreaks of drinking water-related illness reported in 2011-2012 were traced to Legionella bacteria -- twice the figure documented in 2007-2008, the researchers said.

Improperly maintained building plumbing and private groundwater -- not publicly regulated water supplies -- were the culprits in those 2011-2012 outbreaks, according to the agency. Fourteen deaths and more than 430 illnesses occurred from Legionella in that period.

"The key to preventing these outbreaks is maintenance of building plumbing systems," according to Beer and her colleagues. Beer's group conducted both studies published in the Aug. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a CDC publication.

Outbreaks often occur in hospitals or health-care facilities, "illustrating the disproportionate disease burden among hospitalized persons, who are more likely to be older or have underlying conditions that increase their risk of developing Legionnaire's disease," the team said in background notes.

A type of pneumonia, Legionnaire's disease strikes vulnerable people, especially the elderly and those with other underlying medical conditions, the hardest. It can cause coughing, wheezing and breathing problems, but it is not spread from person to person. It is typically treated with antibiotics, according to the CDC.

Identifying and correcting flaws in plumbing systems, private wells and contaminated groundwater supplies could prevent many outbreaks and illnesses, the authors noted.

New York officials and legislators are already working on tougher laws and regulations for cooling towers in response to the outbreak there.

In the second report, the researchers said Legionella bacteria caused 15 of 18 outbreaks and 10 deaths associated with environmental or undetermined water exposures in 2011-2012.

Four outbreaks occurred in hotels and motels, three in hospital settings and three in long-term care facilities. An office, a factory and a mobile home park also experienced outbreaks, the findings showed.

Ornamental fountains were implicated in three of the outbreaks, the researchers found.

Maintenance of water systems -- including drinking water systems, hot tubs, decorative fountains and cooling towers -- is necessary to prevent Legionella and other bacteria from growing, the study authors said.

Copyright © 2015 HealthDay. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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August 13 2015

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Cedarbrook nursing home renovation dependent on number of Medicaid residents - WFMZ Allentown

ALLENTOWN, Pa. -

The decision on whether to renovate or rebuild up to three wings at Lehigh County's Cedarbrook nursing home was the question put before the county commissioners Wednesday.

And the decision about what to do will be driven by the  Medicaid beds at the facility.

Rick Molchany, Lehigh County's director of general services, presented commissioners with building versus renovation options of the South Whitehall Township facility and revenue and expense figures.

"All three of Cedarbrook's wings need to be done, but the D-wing needs to be done first," he said.

Commissioner Brad Osborne said the board's decision will be determined by the designated number of Medicaid beds at the nursing home which are less profitable than residents paying through Medicare or private insurance options.

County officials said the proper mix of residents with varying insurance types should provide a successful formula for financing the necessary building changes and provide the revenues to outweigh expenses.

But commissioners quickly pointed out they must not lose sight of the fact that it's the county's responsibility to provide "a safety net" for residents in need of skilled nursing care, but nowhere else to go.

Commissioner Percy Dougherty said there is no single formula for determining the proper resident mix because market conditions will affect nursing home numbers.

One option is to create semi-private rooms each equipped with its own bathroom as opposed to four beds to a room with a dormitory-style hallway bathroom, Molchany said. A full rebuild, however, would result in 76 fewer beds, he said.

If the county were only to renovate D-wing, the work would reduce the number of beds from 670 to 624.

Renovating D-wing would cost the county about $16 million, according to Molchany. A second $26 million plan would renovate C- and D-wings and transform B-wing into apartments, he said.

The third and final plan is for a completely new facility at a cost of $50 million. .

Molchany told commissioners that Cedarbrook has averaged 547 Medicaid patients annually over the last three years. That's more than most other Lehigh Valley nursing homes, according to Commissioner Vic Mazzioti, adding that the challenge is breaking even on a Medicaid reimbursement bed.

If the county were to renovate or rebuild Cedarbrook, the debt must be structured so as to avoid a a dramatic increase in the county's debt service, Mazzioti said. That leaves the county to investigate other revenue-generating ideas such as increased rehabilitative and adult daycare services, he said.

"We can't reduce beds and Medicaid residents and also find a proper financial picture," Commissioner David Jones said.

Commissioners agreed Wednesday's meeting will be the first of possibly three before making a decision by month's end.

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